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Hidden in plain sight: Brute Forcing Slack private files

Last year we switched to using Slack for all our internal communication and it's working out nicely. It's very developer centric in that it offers integrations with lots of services like Travis CI, GitHub, etc.

When we started using Slack one of our developers was sending a file, had his Developer console open and noticed that even though he'd not chosen to share the file public, the API gave back a public URL anyway. Much to his dismay when he tried it out in a new private browsing window he could download his file without authentication!

Everything you share on Slack automatically becomes available on a public url.

Concerned with the security of our communications (we don't share financials or credentials through Slack fortunately, but we may share company or customer sensitive information) I decided to look into it and make it a teachable moment on 'secret URLs'.

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A PHP Developers look back at OWASP 2013

  • 16-04-2014

"So tell me, why do you use PHP, really?"

I'm sitting at the conference dinner, in the cargo room of the Cap San Diego in Hamburg Germany, supposedly the 'largest cargo ship seaworthy museum in the world'. Across from me is a German student and OWASP volunteer. We've been talking for a while now, he looks forward to a future in pentesting so he volunteered to help with OWASP AppSec Research 2013. AppSec is a conference for Application Security, hosted by the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP). Sometimes they add 'Research' to it to encourage researchers to come and speak.

'Sigh. Here we go again' I think as I hear conversation around us stop, people listening in.

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4 HTTP Security headers you should always be using

What started as a dream for a worldwide library of sorts, has transformed into not only a global repository of knowledge but also the most popular and widely deployed Application Platform: the World Wide Web.
The poster child for Agile, it was not developed as a whole by a single entity, but rather grew as servers and clients expanded it's capabilities. Standards grew along with them.

While growing a solution works very well for discovering what works and what doesn't, it hardly leads to a consistent and easy to apply programming model. This is especially true for security: where ideally the simplest thing that works is also the most secure, it is far too easy to introduce vulnerabilities like XSSCSRF or Clickjacking.

Because HTTP is an extensible protocol browsers have pioneered some useful headers to prevent or increase the difficulty of exploiting these vulnerabilities. Knowing what they are and when to apply them can help you increase the security of your system.  

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